Social Health

Nobody really enjoys talking about health insurance, but it’s a necessary evil, especially for those of us who live with some sort of chronic medical condition. For example, If there is a 20% coinsurance requirement, then a $100 medical bill would cost you $20, and the insurance company would pay the remaining $80 until you meet the total annual out of pocket requirement. HMO’s typically offer no coverage whatsoever for services rendered by non-network providers or for services rendered without proper referral from your primary care physician (PCP).\n\nYou body as well as your mind would need some time to follow these health tips. Also, if one of your family members has a preexisting condition, it could result in your coverage being denied or a more expensive rate for the whole family. If a new plan won’t pay for services you understood were going to be covered, you have a new step-by-step appeals process to challenge a decision.\n\nYet, in a country where pretty much everyone has trash pickup and K-12 schooling for the kids, we’ve been reluctant to address our Second World War mistake and establish a basic system of health-care coverage that’s open to all. The majority of health insurance agents today are captive to one company.\n\nSo I began asking people whether they thought that health care was a right. It is no longer the case that a single health plan can offer full, comprehensive coverage at a competitive price because health care costs are out of control. As suggested by its name, family health insurance is ideal for individuals looking to cover both themselves and their families.\n\nThis is a guy who’s so handy that the cars he drives are rehabbed wrecks rebuilt from spare parts—including the old Volvo that he drove to the strip-mall Mexican restaurant near my family’s house, where we were catching up. But when I asked him about health care he could only shake his head.